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Monthly Archives: August 2018

About Study More Effectively

Learning experts have proposed several different schedules for reviewing study materials, but the following is one that works well for most people. Try it to see if it works for you, or whether it is more effective to introduce minor changes to the review schedule.

First, study what you can thoroughly learn in a 40-minute period. During this time keep your mind actively engaged in the material by making notes, asking yourself questions about it, speaking out loud, and making learning maps. Then take a five or ten minute break to do something completely different, preferably something which includes physical exercise and deep breathing.

After your ten-minute break, go back and review your original material and your written notes. Review for about five minutes. The next day review the material again for five minutes. A week later review it for five minutes. A month later review it for five minutes.

If you need to remember the information longer, review it for five minutes after two months, and then again after six months.

Your review will be even more successful if you speak your thoughts out loud. You can say a verbal summary out loud to yourself, or you can speak the summary to someone else.

Each time you repeat the same physical action, or review the same study material, there are chemical changes that take place at the synapses between your brain cells, making it easier for the signal to go through the next time you repeat that thought or action. That is why review and repetition help fix acquired skills and knowledge in your brain.

Saying the material out loud, or writing out a few notes again will involve more of your brain cells in the process of remembering.

Some Lessons for Success in College

If you don’t want to go to college, then don’t go. You will only be frustrated and miserable. Forcing yourself to attend college will kill your motivation. It takes dedication and persistence to finish. If you are dying to work as a poodle-groomer after high school, then do that.

If you do go to college, be sure you are prepared. The stunts you pulled in high school might not go over so well with college professors. If you were undisciplined before college, you will likely be undisciplined in college and you will likely not meet your main goal–which is to graduate on time. Don’t make a career out of being a college student. The pay is awful.

There are many different types of colleges and universities from which you can choose. The better your academic record, the more choices you have. Each college or university has a specific mission or purpose. Knowing what that purpose is isn’t vital. But you do need to visit the campus and talk to some professors and students in order to determine if that particular institution is right for you. The school you choose should fit you. You shouldn’t try to fit the school.

The cost of higher education continues to go up. It is likely that you will acquire debt in order to finance your education. Fine. But be wise. Getting admitted to a college or university doesn’t necessarily mean you can afford it. The truth is that you can get a good education at a cheap school. Prestige is beneficial; however, what really matters most is not the school itself but the professors who teach there. The job market for college teachers has been saturated for years. It is not uncommon to find PhD’s from prestigious universities teaching at small state colleges and community colleges. So, it is very possible to get a first rate learning experience for a fraction of the cost.

Of course, you’ve probably heard that student loan debt is “good debt.” If it is so good, try missing a few loan payments and see what happens. It won’t be all hugs and kisses.

Yes. You should major in something that you love. Sometimes, doing what you love does not pay the bills. If your first love is money, then preparing to enter a field that will provide you with opportunities to make money is very pragmatic. The trick is to find balance. Major in something that you love and that brings you the amount of money that will allow you to be comfortable, if not rich. By the way, capitalism requires only a few rich people and many not-so-rich people. Which group will you be in?

The degree that you earn will not be enough in today’s competitive workforce. You will need experience and you will not gain experience until you get a job. No one will offer you a job because you lack experience. You know the cycle is cruel. However, there is something that you might not know: While in college, you can offer your labor for free as an intern or volunteer. Your pay is the experience you gain and the relationships you establish with people in the workforce. You become more employable when you know someone who knows someone who used to work for someone who is now the boss at the place where you applied for a job.

Distance Learning

Most people can’t afford to stop work in order to get educated. So how do you learn when you’re still working? How can you educate yourself further? But how can you afford not to go to school when all of your coworkers are working on their educations?

Maybe you’ve tried school but found that it just wouldn’t work with your schedule. Learn what others have about learning via a distance program. Most distance programs offer an asynchronous forum for classrooms. That means that you still have deadlines and weekly (and possibly daily) quotas, you don’t have to be somewhere at the same time as the educator.

Going to school online doesn’t limit you to just a distance university. You can take special classes in a distance education setting that will help you improve your writing, your interview skills, write a better resume, or even learn what you want to do with the rest of your life. If going online doesn’t work for you, consider the many correspondent courses out there that will help you bridge the distances between you and learning. You’ll get access to an educator, who will help guide you, provide you with lectures and notes, and provide you feedback on your work. You’ll find that you’ll learn just as much if not more than you would in a traditional setting.

Online Universities and Degrees

Find out the requirements for admission into the program. Each university has its own set of regulations. All schools will want to see your transcripts from high school or college. Some will ask for test scores as well. Make sure you can meet the minimum requirements for admission before you apply. Gathering the necessary documentation before beginning the application process will save time later.

Distance education programs have different on campus requirements. Some require that you come to campus a few times each semester, while others allow you to complete the entire program at home. Programs offered completely online are more difficult to find, depending on the degree you are seeking. Make sure you can commit to the schedule required by the university. A program that requires you to travel to campus one or more times should be within driving distance of your home.

Find out if the school you will be attending is regionally accredited. Accreditation only matters when you need financial aid or plan to transfer the credits you receive to another university. Some accept credits from schools that are regionally accredited, but others do not. Check with the college you plan on attending later to make sure the credits will transfer. If you are getting your complete degree from the same school, accreditation may not be important.

Another time accreditation may matter is if you are completing a degree that will require a state license. Degrees in nursing, social work and education require licensing. Check with your state to make sure they will accept your degree for licensing. Some states won’t accept degrees from schools not recognized by the US Department of Education. Check with your school, state or Department of education to find out if the college is recognized.

If you have credits you want to transfer from another school, make sure the online university you are considering will accept your credits. Have your official transcripts sent to the school for an admissions counselor to review. Ask about any restrictions the school has for transferring credits. Most colleges won’t accept more than fifty percent of the degree requirements in transfer credits. Some have a limit on the time you can transfer credits, usually ten years.